Friday, March 9, 2012

Revisiting 'Titanic' in 3D

Yesterday I was lucky enough to be invited to the launch of Titanic in 3D at Event Cinemas George Street. The special presentation, which included several sequences from the film (approx 40 minutes of 3D footage), was introduced by the film’s producer, Jon Landau, who also participated in a friendly Q&A session at the conclusion of the presentation.

Landau, who worked closely with director James Cameron on the film’s transition to 3D, declared, “if they were to make Titanic again, it would be in 3D”. Landau also said that Fox were considering the re-release a ‘new release’. Due to this year marking the 100-year anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, it was decided that the film would be once again be made available for cinemagoers aided by the newest technology.


Landau jovially discussed the reactions of stars Kate Winslet and Leo DiCaprio to the 3D conversion, revealed the lengthy process of the transition (which took 60 weeks of work and about $18 Million), answered questions about his favourite scene in the film, and how difficult it was to convince the studios to re-release the film. At the time this idea was being pitched, there had been no re-releases. The Lion King and The Phantom Menace are two that have been re-released since.

Landau informed us that there were actually more visual effect shots in Titanic than in Avatar, and the effects have remained exactly the same. In response to the common assumption that 3D is only effective at enhancing action sequences, Landau is adamant that 3D “actually enhances the dramatic sequences more”.

Though I only saw a selection of scenes from the film, it remains an awe-inspiring cinematic experience, and a groundbreaking technical achievement. Having not seen the film for what must be close to a decade (and not on a cinema screen since 1997, when I was still very young), the youth of the two leads (and they were only 18/19 at the time of filming) raised a chuckle, but it does hold up really well.


As for the 3D, it is mostly stunning, save for a few times when the moving shots seemed to be slightly blurry, and with the elimination of the ship’s lighting in the concluding stages, it was difficult to see the actor’s faces. But, the ship’s sinking is still one of the most breathtaking cinematic moments of all time – and it is made even more scary by the addition of the 3D, creating an experience which absorbs the audience so much that it feels as though they are situated on the ship themselves.

Still, for many young people – and pretty much everyone under the age of 20, seeing Titanic on the big screen is something they never would have experienced. On April the 5th there is an opportunity for these people, as well as lifelong fans of the film (and being one of the highest grossing films of all time, there are a lot of fans) to see the film again in the environment of a darkened cinema. Don't miss it.

13 comments:

  1. I've found the very first Titanic film, In Nacht und Eis on Youtube. I think I'll be marking the Titanic's centenary with that rather than this...

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    1. That's fair enough. I am sure it is excellent too.

      I have accepted an invite to the screening later in the month - so I'll be seeing it on the big screen again. Hey, I might write something up about the film.

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  2. I was only 8 when the movie was released so I never seen it in theatres and I'm very exciting about it being re-realsed again. I always loved the film, thought it was the perfect blend of everything and Winslet's performance is simply stunning.

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    1. I saw it when I was 9 in theatres. I wasn't that excited for the re-release, but when I realised I had only watched it twice in its entirety, another chance to see it in a cinema is something I shouldn't miss. I blends every genre doesn't it? The sinking is genuinely scary, and it even becomes a thriller there for a while. I like both Kate and Leo, and watching them when they are this young (late teens at the time) is a treat. Kate is wonderful in this.

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  3. I think I saw it in the theater twice. It isn't my favorite movie, but the GF says we have to see it. I'm glad to hear the 3D isn't really a gimmick like it feels in so many other movies.

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    1. I'd go check it out. I'm not sure the 3D is necessary - when is it ever? - but it enhanced the experience at times.

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  4. I saw it in the theater 4 times. And I've been waiting since that last time to see it again. I.CAN'T.WAIT.

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    1. Whoa! That's pretty mental man. The sinking is extraordinary - and it is a pretty swell love story too. The Bill Paxton opening is soooo corny, however. Hope you dig it this time around.

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  5. I'm not going to go see it in theater again but yea, if I hadn't seen already, I totally would so I definitely can get behind it being released again even though it's a total money grab ah!

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    1. Understood. Yeah, spending 18 Million (which could have been used to fund a feature) to convert it to 3D seems to me like they are pretty confident it will make them some money.

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